Poetry Map

We all know poems about Scotland but can the shape and nature of Scotland be drawn entirely in poetry? StAnza has set itself the challenge to see if this is the case. Find out more about the project and how to submit your poem by clicking here, or browse the poems using the map. Latest poems are listed below.

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 214: Gatehouse of Fleet

Friday 2 October 2015, 18:48

My Luve Is Like A Read Read Story

Wee cosy, tranquil Gatehouse Library
Ah come in quite a lot tay see yi,
Tay read yir books and use yir wifi
An' chat tay Joannie*, Sae noo
Ah'm goannie sing yir praises,
Ah'm pure dead goannie.

Ye're sic' a cultural oasis,
Wan o' ma favourite learnin' places,
Yir books can form the verra basis
O' Scottish brain power,
Enrichin' minds an' cheeky faces
O' Scottish wean power.

So let us pray they never close yi
Tay those who would, we will oppose yi.
We'll be the storm an ill wind blows yi
At sic' a crunch time.
The only closin' we'll allow
Is Joannie's lunch time.

Chik J Duncan

 

* Joan, the librarian

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

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All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 213: Burntisland

Thursday 1 October 2015, 16:43

Embers

Haar spectres from the Binn village
hiding on the hill.
Awake on dead lava
Helter Skelter of their inner ashes.
climbing, descending, and swirling around the town.
Scalloped edges of the seasons
not knowing those
from here or from there
only before the Shows come and afterwards.
Memories circling the Links grass
with fairy rings
danced through by dogs, chased by wondering children/
in the shelter of the Binn.
The smelter of town talk
incomers old and new
building lives on the red metal dust.
Manipulated particles of nature now reformed
aluminium long rigid: red ash giving amber qualities
hot moments captured
cooled like their tales.
All the while the Black Rock watches the boats pass over
waiting to see if the wreck ever rises to meet them and glow.

Clare Archibald

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

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All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 212: Edinburgh

Wednesday 30 September 2015, 18:34

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

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All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 211: Cumnock

Tuesday 22 September 2015, 17:02

United Colours of Cumnock

My town, is a green town
(but no like a "fuck the Queen" town),
no, it's a tree in every scene town,
wae gairdens freshly dug.
That's green that pours from every crack,
through pavements, viaducts, fitba parks,
where men who suffer heart attacks, go walks
wae three leg dugs.

My town, is a blue town
a "who the fuck are you" town,
what school did you go to town
and are you one of us?
That's blue that seeps through doors and walls,
from pubs and bookies, village halls,
where men would guard old Derry's walls,
instead of guardin us.

My town was once a red town,
another miner dead town,
a men who fought and bled town,
wae brave and stalwart wives.
That's red that came from meeting rooms,
from folk that worked the pumps and looms,
when borough bands played different tunes,
and marched - for better lives.

But now my town's a grey town,
a fifty mils a day town,
a watch life slip away town,
a tunnel wae nae light.
That's grey that weeps from dying eyes,
bewildered parents, children's cries,
wae skinny erms and stick like thighs,
and nae strength left - tae fight!

Jim Monaghan

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 210: Coigach

Monday 21 September 2015, 17:13

Zaragoza

An ancient Tarrasius stirs in a Scottish stone,
awakening distant Sargasso memories.

Living drill shafts, big sea-eyed,
silver rippled, bore down fast burns.

Anguilla migrates to mate and die
in deep Gyre spawning grounds.
Mini pearls drift in warm Gulf currents,
transparent larvae emerge,
delicate rowan leaf filigree.

Months pass, marine snow nourished,
gelatinous Glass Eel masses
gather along West Coast shore lines,
mercurial strands, pin-head eyed,
advance towards ancestral Coigach,
boulder scattered, glacial scarred.

Bubbling streams branch upwards,
divide, decrease, trickle, weave
around dark peat sedges,
sphagnum sparkling.
Freshwater tree flickers,
river meerschaum frosted.

Great eel tress procession transforms
clear sea silver, freshwater brown.
Long lace elvers, gold flecked,
unravel into blunt head gargoyles.
Catadromous carnivores slither
through decaying bracken arches,
desolate moors, moon muted.

This remote Scottish hillside is the centre
of everything and nothing, life is everywhere
and nowhere, belongs to everyone and no one.

Life begins here and ends here,
oceans and clouds are born here.

Those who migrate are compelled to return.

 

Alison Barr

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map

Poetry Map of Scotland, poem no. 209: Habbies Howe near Carlops

Sunday 20 September 2015, 16:24

Winter Solstice in Habbies Howe

To escape the razzmatazz
and jazz of Christmas,
I walk, this early afternoon
through Habbies Howe
where the night’s rain
has pared the earth
clean from the river’s rock
and the rook is a simple
brush-stroke in the sky.
The air is quiet and damp.
The bird’s chink,
thrown from branch
to bare branch, is bright
as the white sun
and the trees stand
silent but beautiful
– oh, so beautiful –
in their plain clothes.

Anita John

View our full map of Scotland in Poems as it grows »

For instructions on how to submit your own poems, click here

All poems from our Poetry Map of Scotland  are subject to copyright and should not be reproduced otherwise without the poet's permission.

Categories: Poetry Map